Do you know what will happen to your business by 2025?

Igor PauletičFourth Industrial Revolution, Sales

I’ll be forty-nine in 2025. My first child will be in college, the second in secondary school, and the third will still be in primary school. I think that the eldest two, at least, will be at precisely that age when they’ll be making key decisions on how they want to live their lives, their career visions, and so on. But that won’t be nearly as fateful as it might have been for their grandparents’ generation when they were that age.

You may have top-notch expertise right now, but it could be worthless in a few years

Today FrodX is considered a leading customer engagement specialist. We introduce expertise and technology to companies that no one in the region can currently compete with. Because we’d like to keep this position in the future, we spend a great deal of time discussing what steps we should take in the future, where development is heading, how people are changing, and how technology changes society.

If you asked one of our technicians, who mostly deal with technology and usually don’t see the whole picture, what they do at FrodX, they would tell you they create “smart” websites. The sort that track every visitor, or their current interests and interests they’ve shown in the past, and know how to dynamically (automatically) adapt the selection of content and the intensity of communication accordingly, so that we can systemically approach them as well as possible and consequently build our customer relationship, even though no physical contact has been established yet. Another technician may also add that through integration with marketing automation, the CRM system, and the corporate notification system, this kind of smart website can manage the entire process of winning new customers and help optimize it based on the data obtained. In any case, in the most banal terms, our customer ends up with a website and a system that sends spam automatically.

Expertise that is top-notch today could be worthless in a few years. Click To Tweet

Can you imagine the shock a top expert in designing the smart websites mentioned above experiences when I explain to him that by 2025 websites may no longer be needed at all? That they will no longer exist. At least not ones with the concept we’ve known for the past ten years. There may also be no public internet by 2025, either. We may find it too dangerous. I think that providers will be able to connect with customers much more directly and interactively than the concept of online marketing offers today.

During the fourth industrial revolution, digital connectivity is fundamentally changing society.

The Deep Shift: Technology Tipping Points and Social Impact survey report published by the World Economic Forum in September 2015 predicts twenty-one technological shifts, their tipping points, and expected dates of their arrival on the market. Can you imagine that implantable mobile phones will be commercially available by 2025? That by then 10% of reading glasses will be connected to the internet? That practically all electric devices will be connected to the internet? Most internet traffic to homes is currently for communication and entertainment, whereas by 2015 more than 50% of internet traffic will be delivered to homes for appliances and devices. The processing of all these enormous quantities of data is already being slowly taken over by artificial intelligence, which will not only analyze data but also make decisions and manage activities.

Today the ability to learn and adapt to new conditions is the fundamental capital of individuals and organizations.

If the World Economic Forum’s predictions come true, it’s pretty clear that a considerably different type of technology will start to be used for connecting with customers in the future. I’m almost certain that the technological expertise my best-qualified colleagues have today will no longer be worth much by 2025. In order to capture data on customers’ interests, we’ll have to be able to connect with completely different systems or buy them from personal data aggregation providers (data banks). In order to communicate with customers, we’ll most likely have to develop and manage intelligent holograms rather than websites that can automatically send emails.

Customer communication and connectivity will be very different in 10 years. Do you ever think about this? Click To Tweet

When I tell my coworkers about these things, they feel worried because they haven’t learned any of this new stuff yet, but on the other hand, they feel reassured because we’re already thinking about this.

The only long-term solution is enthusiasm, creative thinking, and hard work.

To conclude my introductory thoughts about my children … Before I graduated from high school, when I was supposed to be thinking about what I’d like to do in life, I couldn’t even imagine that by 2025 I’d be helping companies design and manage holograms, and buy and process their prospects’ personal data in order for the holograms to be able to suitably talk to or approach new customers. To be honest, I still find this unimaginable, even though I’ve been actively studying this for quite some time. I’m realizing that it’s key that my children learn to be enthusiastic, think creatively, and work hard. That they courageously take up any challenges that may cross their paths. If they develop all of this, they will be able to easily adapt to changes, which in the future will occur much faster than today.

What will happen to your business by 2025? Click To Tweet

What about you? Have you already thought about what will happen to your business by 2025? We certainly have. At least regarding the part about how you’ll be winning new customers and trying to retain the old ones. Would you like to share any thoughts with me in the next couple of days?

 

igor.pauletic@frodx.com

 

The-fall-of-CRM

 

About the Author

Igor Pauletič

Founder and CEO of FrodX, who uses his rich experience to assist customers to transfer the latest technological, operational, and social trends into their business operations. He mostly focuses on new product development, omnichannel sales architectures, and go-to-market strategies. As a team member, he fills the role of the idea generator and constantly challenges the status quo and established decision making patterns.